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Organic Acids in Coffee in 95 seconds or less...

One pesky test of the Q exam has to do with Organic Acids and Chemistry of Coffee. In a nutshell (or a coffee husk) we broke down five of the most prevalent acids found in coffee, differentiating between their tastes, and what happens in the roasting process to each of them. The five acids we tested for were Citric, Acetic, Quinic, Malic, and Chlorogenic. We were given a control sample of coffee along with a cup of coffee having the added acid, as a means of comparing. Side-by-side it was easy to differentiate between the control and additive, an easy pass. So here we go... Citric Acid is known for having a sour and fruity taste to it and found in fruits...

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More on roasting:

The kaleidoscopic array of flavors you find in your coffee from cup to cup is a result of both the natural chemical makeup of the green coffee and the trick we roasters have learned to unlock its potential—we roast it to secret profiles. The raw coffee bean—not actually a legume but the pit of a small, red fruit—contains roughly 300 volatile compounds, making it chemically well equipped to be turned into a very flavorful beverage. These aromatics, however, are locked away in the bean’s extremely dense cellular structure. Roasting the tiny, rock-hard pits transforms them in two major ways. The first change is to the aromatic compounds. Heating the beans to temperatures of around 400 degrees leads to an increase...

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